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 Injun2 Leon Russell refused to come onstage and perform until her sold x thousand of these cheezy tamborines. He held out forever, then I guess finally enough people bought the stupid rip off things that he came on and performed. As an Okie from Muskogee, I was ashamed of our hometown boy. Willie Nelson's 4th of July Picnic May 23, 2019
 Arisa O 21st Birthday!! Got a nickel bag of funk. Digable Planets May 23, 2019
 Lauren Henderson Mine and my husband's first date :) Lake Martin Amphitheater May 22, 2019
 Heaven03 I think Ignite and Saves The Day were openers. Face To Face May 22, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment Memorial Hall -- Kansas City, Kansas R U S H 2112 1976-77 Tour May 20, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment AUG 9 2005 Iron Maiden Setlist at Fiddler's Green Amphitheatre, Greenwood Village, CO, USA Tour: Eddie Rips Up the World Tour statistics Add setlist Play Iron Maiden on Amazon Music Setlist SHARE SETLIST The Ides of March Play Video Murders in the Rue Morgue Play Video Another Life Play Video Prowler Play Video The Trooper Play Video Remember Tomorrow Play Video Where Eagles Dare Play Video Run to the Hills Play Video Revelations Play Video Wrathchild Play Video Die With Your Boots On Play Video Phantom of the Opera Play Video The Number of the Beast Play Video Hallowed Be Thy Name Play Video Iron Maiden Play Video Encore: Running Free Play Video Drifter Play Video Sanctuary Ronnie James Dio May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment Aerosmith JUL 26 1983 Aerosmith Setlist at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Morrison, CO, USA Tour: Rock in a Hard Place Tour statistics Add setlist Play Aerosmith on Amazon Music Setlist SHARE SETLIST Back in the Saddle Play Video Big Ten Inch Record (Bull Moose Jackson cover) Play Video Mama Kin Play Video Three Mile Smile Play Video Reefer Head Woman Play Video Lord of the Thighs Play Video No More No More Play Video Lick and a Promise Play Video Sick as a Dog Play Video Sweet Emotion Play Video Dream On Play Video Same Old Song and Dance Play Video Walk This Way Play Video Milk Cow Blues (Kokomo Arnold cover) Play Video Encore: Toys in the Attic Play Video The Train Kept A-Rollin' (Tiny Bradshaw cover) Ronnie James Dio May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment Ronnie James Dio Aerosmith JUL 26 1983 Dio Setlist at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Morrison, CO, USA Tour: Holy Diver Tour statistics Add setlist Play Dio on Amazon Music Setlist SHARE SETLIST Stand Up and Shout Play Video Straight Through the Heart Play Video Children of the Sea (Black Sabbath cover) Play Video Rainbow in the Dark Play Video Holy Diver Play Video Drum Solo Play Video Stargazer (Rainbow cover) (followed by guitar solo) Play Video Heaven and Hell (Black Sabbath cover) Play Video Man on the Silver Mountain (Rainbow cover) Ronnie James Dio May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment JUL 11 2015 Rush Setlist at Pepsi Center, Denver, CO, USA Tour: R40 Live: 40th Anniversary Tour Tour statistics Add setlist Play Rush on Amazon Music Setlist SHARE SETLIST Set 1: The World Is...The World Is Play Video The Anarchist Play Video Clockwork Angels Play Video Headlong Flight (with 'Drumbastica' mini drum solo) Play Video Far Cry Play Video The Main Monkey Business Play Video One Little Victory Play Video Animate Play Video Roll the Bones (with 'celebrity rappers' video) Play Video Distant Early Warning Play Video Subdivisions Play Video Set 2: No Country for Old Hens Play Video Tom Sawyer Play Video YYZ Play Video The Spirit of Radio Play Video Natural Science Play Video Jacob's Ladder Play Video Cygnus X-1 Book II: Hemispheres Part I: Prelude Play Video Cygnus X-1 (Book One: The Voyage Parts 1… more ) Play Video Closer to the Heart Play Video Xanadu Play Video 2112 Part I: Overture Play Video 2112 Part II: The Temples of Syrinx Play Video 2112 Part IV: Presentation Play Video 2112 Part VII: Grand Finale Play Video Encore: Mel's Rock Pile starring Eugene Levy Play Video Lakeside Park Play Video Anthem Play Video What You're Doing Play Video Working Man (with 'Garden Road' outro) Play Video Exit Stage Left R U S H May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment R.I.P.RUSH GONA MISS YOU R U S H May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment Star-Studded Crowd Toasts Rush at the Forum for Last (Ever?) Show: Concert Review 9:16 PM PDT 8/2/2015 by Jeff Cornell FACEBOOK TWITTER EMAIL ME Richard Sibbald Geddy Lee of Rush A farewell to kings TWITTER The beloved band wraps 40th anniversary tour in Los Angeles with a powerful and memorable career-spanning set for the ages. Rush closed out its 40th anniversary tour on Saturday night (Aug. 1) at the Forum in Los Angeles, marking the band’s 25th show at the venue and bringing what could be its final tour to a triumphant end (the band has hinted that it may be their last time on the road, though nothing has been made official). The iconic Canadian power trio consisting of Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson and Neil Peart performed a career-spanning show that touched on 16 of Rush’s 20 studio albums (the exceptions: 2004’s cover album Feedback, 1996’s Test for Echo, 1989’s Presto and 1985’s Power Windows) in reverse chronological order. The monumental two-set concert featured radio friendly hits, deep album cuts, fan favorites and songs they haven’t played in more than 35 years. ADVERTISING The band took the stage at 7:52 p.m., after a short two-minute animated video of their four-decade progressive rock journey. As the crowd roared, Rush kicked the evening off with “The Anarchist” and quickly followed it up with “Headlong Flight,” both off of their most recent album, 2012’s Clockwork Angels. Bassist and vocalist Lee then greeted the L.A. crowd and invited them to “travel backwards” with the band through their catalog. Read more Clay Aiken on Donald Trump's Run for President: "Anybody Who Discounts Him Is Shortsighted" After perfectly blazing through an arsenal of songs from their newer albums, including “Far Cry,” “One Little Victory” and “Animate,” the band showed a lighter side by dialing up the title track of their 1991 effort Roll the Bones, which featured an accompanying video showing Game of Thrones' Peter Dinklage, Paul Rudd, Jason Segel, Tom Morello and The Trailer Park Boys rapping along to the song’s hip-hop verse. The crowd really dug the theatrics, and the energy in the room ramped up as fans rapped along with the stars. After a searing version of “Distant Early Warning,” the lone track pulled from 1984’s Grace Under Pressure, Rush was joined by violinist Jonathan Dinklage (the brother of actor Peter). The special guest is no stranger to performing with the band, after being a part of the string section on their Clockwork Angels Tour, which marked the first time Rush ever used outside musicians onstage. He joined the trio for the rare ballad “Losing It,” marking only the fourth time the band has ever played the song from the 1982 album Signals live. Rush ended the first set with an urgent and powerful version of “Subdivision,” also peeled off the Signals album. Similar to jam bands, Rush fans proudly boast about how many shows and tours they have seen. During the set break, one fan bragged he had been to 30 Rush concerts and hasn’t missed a tour since 1981’s Moving Pictures. He also recalled seeing them in the second row at the Forum back in 1985; now 20 years later he was catching what could be their last concert. The show was also the inaugural concert for the future Rush fan base. One father brought his 6-year-old son because he had to have him see the band in case it was the last time. Read more Lollapalooza: Watch Paul McCartney Do Rare "FourFiveSeconds" Performance, Collab With Brittany Howard It is that kind of across-the-board fandom that represents Rush and its legion of dedicated and intensely loyal fans, among them a slew of artists and celebs who turned out for the Forum show, including the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Chad Smith, Tool’s Danny Carey, Foo Fighters’ Taylor Hawkins, (all there to honor legendary Rush drummer Neil Peart), Robby Krieger and South Park creator Matt Stone. At one point during “Red Barchetta,” Jack Black — who was surprisingly left alone on the floor — danced around playing air guitar. Indeed, if there's one concert where air playing is encouraged — air guitar, air bass, air drums — it's a Rush show. When Rush returned to the stage for the second set with a new stage setup, gone were the stacks of Hughes and Kettner amps behind Lifeson and the washing machines behind Lee, in their place a wall of Marshall guitar amps and Ampeg bass amps that were slowly removed through the set by stage hands wearing R40 jumpsuits. They launched into “Tom Saywer,” (which featured a video intro from South Park character’s band Lil’ Rush). The song got a huge thunderous reaction from the capacity crowd, and fans got to see a comedic side of the band during the song as the video screen showed Alex Lifeson playing bass, Geddy Lee on drums and an out-of-place and awkward looking Neil Peart on guitar perfectly synched to the live song. Photo by Richard Sibbald As the band proceeded backwards down the number line with each song, their stage also was set to rewind. The aforementioned stagehands constantly changed the look of the show. By the time the band took the stage for the encore, Rush simply played in front of a red curtain with one guitar amp and one bass amp on the stage that was once full of hardware. The curtain lifted at one point showing a high school gym with a basketball hoop on the video screens, taking fans back to the band’s start. Among the many highlights of the nearly three-hour concert were deep cuts like “Jacob’s Ladder,” from 1980’s Permanent Waves (the song had been on the shelf for 35 years prior to the R40 tour). The band also wowed fans by playing the 18-minute opus “Cygnus X-1” and the equally epic “Xanadu,” which featured Lee and Lifeson on double-neck instruments. The two switched off between the two necks with amazing precision and Peart also pulled double duty, playing the tubular bells and spinning around to crash down on his drum kit right on time in the majestic song. During an emotional performance of one of the band’s biggest hits, “Closer to the Heart,” Lifeson and Peart had a lengthy conversation, gesturing and laughing back and forth, sharing a moment before Lee joined them to rock out the ending of the classic track from 1977’s A Farewell To Kings. During the ballad, the arena was a sea of lighters and cell phones as many fans held up 2112 light-up scepters, which they clearly bought earlier at the merch stand. The band ended the second set with another fan favorite “2112,” before returning for a four-song encore that included the rarity “Lakeside Park,” which the band hadn’t played on tour since 1978. The show ended with the head-banging “Anthem” and two songs from their eponymous debut “What You’re Doing” and “Working Man.” At the end of the show, Peart stood on his drum riser and took photos of the crowd, before joining Lifeson and Lee for one final bow. Lee then addressed the crowd: “Thank you Los Angeles for 40 amazing years," he said. "I do hope we meet again sometime.” The parting message left longtime fans with hope — perhaps Rush will return to thrill again. Set List: Set One: The Anarchist Headlong Flight Far Cry The Main Monkey Business One Little Victory Animate Roll The Bones Distant Early Warning Losing It (featuring Jonathan Dinklage) Subdivisions Set Two: Tom Saywer Red Barchetta The Spirit of Radio Jacob’s Ladder Cygnus X-1 Book II: Hemispheres Cygnus X-1: Book I: The Voyage Closer to the Heart Xanadu 2112 Part I: Overture 2112 Part II: The Temples of Syrinx 2112: Part IV: The Presentation 2112: Part VII: Grand Finale Encore: Lakeside Park Anthem What You’re Doing Working Man Correction: A prev R U S H May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment February 4, 1974 Larry's Hideaway -- Toronto, Ontario February 5, 1974 Larry's Hideaway -- Toronto, Ontario February 6, 1974 Larry's Hideaway -- Toronto, Ontario February 7, 1974 Larry's Hideaway -- Toronto, Ontario R U S H May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment First Time Date: 8/14/74, Civic Area, Pittsburgh, PA Label: I-vent 0706.33-99 Source: Audience Quality Rating: D Description: Here is the first Rush performance with Neil Peart in America. Rush did play a few North American dates with original drummer, John Rutsey. I picked up this show purely for historical reasons. You know, it's Neil's first show with the band and it's the first show of the first tour, etc. Other than that, the sound here is dreadful. It sounds like the taper was sitting on the microphone. You can make out Geddy's wails and some guitars but otherwise this is a muddy mess not to be bothered with unless you're hardcore. By the way, in this first show, Rush was opening for Uriah Heep (imagine that!). Also, you can hear the taper and perhaps someone nearby mocking the sound of Geddy's voice. I'll admit, it was "opening day" and Geddy never sounded scarier. Neil Peart joins Rush 1st gig May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment Neil Peart Joins Rush Neil Ellwood Peart (pronounced "Peert" not "Pert"), born September 12, 1952, near Hagersville, Ontario, is the drummer and lyricist for the Canadian rock band Rush. Rush is the most successful band from Canada, playing together for 41 years and selling 25 million records in the U.S. and 40 million records worldwide (Celine Dion is the top-selling Canadian solo artist with 50 million albums). Following Rush's successful R40 Live tour in 2015, Peart announced his retirement in a Drumhead magazine article. In 2018, Alex Lifeson confirmed in an interview with the Globe and Mail that Rush has "no plans to record or tour any more." Essential Rush recordings include: Fly by Night (1974), 2112 (1976), Permanent Waves (1980), Moving Pictures (1981), Exit...Stage Left (1982), Grace Under Pressure (1984), Power Windows (1985), Roll the Bones (1991), Counterparts (1993), Vapor Trails (2002), and Clockwork Angels (2012). Neil Peart in Seattle on R40 tour Neil Peart plays his "El Darko" DW drum kit during the R40 tour, Seattle, WA, 2015. Photo by Andy Olson. Early life and joining Rush Peart grew up in St. Catharines, Ontario, during the rise of rock and roll and the decline of jazz, and both would influence his drumming style. While his initial inspiration to play drums came from watching The Gene Krupa Story on TV, it was the "second wave" British rock bands and their drummers, including Keith Moon (The Who), Mitch Mitchell (Jimi Hendrix), and Ginger Baker (Cream), who ignited a fire in him. His single-minded journey to become a professional musician would take him through the Niagara Peninsula's vibrant music scene and later London, England. It was during his time abroad that Peart became dislliusioned with the music industry, and after 18 months of enduring "poverty and anononymity" he returned to St. Catharines in December 1972. After a stint at Sam the Record Man in Toronto (where he met his first wife Jackie Taylor), Peart began working full-time at his father's farm equipment store as parts manager. In July 1974, he landed an audition with Rush, who needed a drummer for their upcoming North American tour. Read more about Peart's early years. Professional drumming career with Rush Over their four-decade career, Rush developed their own style of progressive rock, weaving together heavy metal, art rock, reggae, new wave, pop, grunge, and classical styles with thoughtful lyrics. Their catalog includes 20 diverse studio albums, 9 live albums, 10 video albums, sold-out tours, and a fiercely loyal fan base. Rush's last studio album, Clockwork Angels (2012) is considered one of their best by both fans and critics. During that tour (2012-2013), Rush played 10 of 12 tracks from the album and were joined by a string ensemble. As a drummer, Peart is known for his large drum kits, creative and intricate parts, and extensive drum solos that delight both drummers and non-drummers alike. He's won 34 reader's poll awards from Modern Drummer, including 12 consecutive "best recorded performance" awards (15 in all). In 2013, he won the MVP award and Best Prog Drummer for Modern Drummer. One reason for Peart's enduring success is his endless curiosity, experimentation, and quest for continuous improvement. After adding an ever-expanding wall of acoustic percussion to his setup throughout the late 1970s and early 1980s, Peart added a Simmons electronic satellite kit during the Grace Under Pressure tour in 1984. By the Test for Echo tour in 1997, Peart would abandon all acoustic percussion in favor of his satellite kit, triggers, and his melodic malletKat keyboard trigger. Neil Peart during the Permanent Waves tour in 1980, surrounded by a wall of percussion. After two decades of playing with Rush, Peart set out to reinvent himself in the mid-1990s, studying with jazz drummer Freddie Gruber. He used these new techniques on the Test for Echo album, documenting his process in his first instructional video A Work in Progress. Later, Peart would study with Peter Erskine to focus on what he called "chops and groove" and a more improvisational approach. In the article 2015 article "Neil Peart Reflects on 50 Years of Hitting Things with Sticks," Peart wrote: It was Peter who helped me conquer—or at least attack—what was for me the Final Frontier: improvisation. Having developed a certain amount of compositional tools and habits over forty years of playing, I was determined to become freer and more spontaneous. Peter helped me toward that goal with guidance in developing deeper time-sense and greater musicality. (With credit to Nick "Booujzhe" Raskulinecz, too, who encouraged and enabled my improvising in the studio.) During breaks from touring with Rush, Peart recorded or performed with Vertical Horizon, the Buddy Rich Band, Jeff Berlin, and the Rheostatics. In 2008, Peart returned to New York City for his second Buddy Rich Memorial concert. In 2009, he recorded a new version of "The Hockey Song." Starting in the 1990s, Peart chronicled his development as a drummer in multiple instructional and documentary videos. Drum and cymbal endorsements In addition to improving his technique, Peart also searched for new sounds with his drums and cymbals. Thoughout his career, he endorsed four different drum companies, including Slingerland, Tama, Ludwig, and Drum Workshop. Even with all these changes, from 1977-1996 Peart continued to prefer his Slingerland Artist Model snare—a drum he'd bought secondhand for $60. Peart played Zildjian cymbals (and Wuhan China-types starting in 1978) until 2004, when he switched to Sabian and developed his own signature cymbal line, Paragon. Interestingly, until he developed his own cymbals Peart used the same Zildjian 22-inch Ping Ride cymbal on every Rush tour and studio recording through Vapor Trails. Starting in 1984, Peart began using Simmons electronic drums and switched to d-drum in 1989. He began playing Roland V-drums and cymbals when he returned to Rush in 2002 for the Vapor Trails tour. Starting on the Hold Your Fire tour, Peart began using an electronic KAT keyboard, which allowed him to incorporate melodic percussion samples in songs and his drum solo. The only equipment Peart would use throughout his entire career were Pro-Mark 747 drum sticks, which he'd been using for over 17 years before officially endorsing them in 1991. After that, Peart began using an autograph model, starting with his first Buddy Rich Memorial Scholarship concert in 1991. Peart played the sticks "backwards" (hitting with the butt ends) until he reinvented his drumming style in 1996. R40 Live tour and retirement In 2015, Rush toured 34 North Amercian cities on the R40 Live tour, described as the "last tour of this magnitude." Rush played to mostly sold-out audiences, bringing their fans on journey from the present to the past, with instruments and the stage devolving around them. They ended the show in a virtual high school gym, complete with rotating disco ball—back to where it started. For the first time, Peart used two DW drum kits on stage—one modern kit for the first set and a retro kit for the second set. Rush released a video and CD of the show in November 2015. In December 2015, Neil Peart wrote an article for Drumhead magazine, "Neil Peart Reflects on 50 Years of Hitting Things with Sticks," where he essentially confirmed his retirement: Now after fifty years of devotion to hitting things with sticks, I feel proud, grateful and satisfied. The reality is that my style of drumming is largely an athletic undertaking, and it does not pain me to realize that, like all athletes, there comes a time to ... take yourself out of the game. I would much rather set it aside than face the predicament described in our song "Losing It." (From 1982 it was performed live for the first time on our fortieth anniversary tour, R40, in 2015). In the song's two verses, an aging dancer and a writer face their diminishing, twilight talents with pain and despair, ("Sadder still to watch it die, that never to have known it.") Aside from publishing his seventh non-fiction book in 2016, Far and Wide: Bring that Horizon to Me!, Rush fans have heard very little from Peart. Professional writing career In addition to his day job as a musician, Peart is a prolific writer. He's written six non-fiction books, including The Masked Rider (1999), Ghost Rider (2002), Traveling Music: The Soundtrack to My Life and Times (2004), Roadshow: Landscape With Drums: A Concert Tour by Motorcycle (2006), Far & Away: A Prize Every Time (2011), and Far & Near: On Days Like These (2014). In September 2016, Peart published his seventh non-fiction book, Far and Wide: Bring that Horizon to Me! Peart has also written many articles for Modern Drummer and and other magazines, and posted updates to NeilPeart.net through 2016. For the Clockwork Angels album, Neil Peart collaborated with writer and friend Kevin J. Anderson on a Clockwork Angels novel, which became a New York Times bestseller, and was later adapted into a comic series. In September 2015, Peart and Anderson published a follow-up novel, Clockwork Lives, which further explored the Clockwork world and its characters. A graphic novel of Clockwork Lives will be released in 2018. Personal life Peart lives in the Los Angels area with his wife Carrie Nuttall (married in 2000) and daughter Olivia (born in 2010). Before this, Peart was married to Jackie Taylor for 22 years, and they had one daughter Selena. In August 1997, Selena died in a car accident, and Jackie died a year later of cancer. Peart chronicled his story of loss and recovery in his book, Ghost Rider. Trivia and facts about Neil Peart He officially joined Rush on July 29, 1974, Geddy Lee's birthday. In his spare time, Peart reads, rides BMW motorcycles, drives fast cars, snowshoes, birdwatches, and hikes. His favorite drink after a concert or a long day on the road is The Macallan. Peart's nicknames are "Pratt," "Bubba," and "The Professor." On Rush tours, in order to protect his privacy he used aliases to check in to hotels, including Joe Rockhead (from the Flintstones), Hank Kimball (Greenacres), Larry Tate (Bewitched), Johnny Gilbert (announcer from Jeapordy), Waylon Smithers (The Simpsons), and Paul Drake (Perry Mason). His drumming style is inspired by countless drummers, but he's mentioned Keith Moon of the Who as one of his most important early influences. In 1993, Peart interviewed Jean Chrétien as part of Much Music's political series. He's appeared in several films as himself, including I Love Your Man and Adventures of Power. He's even appeared in animated form in Aqua Teen Force Colon Movie for Theaters (2007). Early in his touring days, Peart figured out that he had a lot of free time between shows. He decided to use this time to read. In addition, he took up other hobbies, including building model kits. One of them as an extremely detailed replica of Alex Lifeson's 1977 Jaguar XJS, "white with red interior, with full engine plumbing, working suspension and steering, and even articulated seats that folded forward and slid on little rails." During the Roll the Bones tour in 1992, Peart formed a backstage lounge act "The Murphtones" with crew member Skip Daley. He would also jam in the tuning room with the members of Primus before the show. In 1996, he became an Officer of The Order of Canada, the highest civilian decoration in Canada. In 2012, he received the Governor General's Award for Performing Arts: Lifetime Artistic Achievement (Popular Music) along with his bandmates. In 2013, after years of eligibility, Peart and Rush were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. At the mere mention of Rush's name by Jann Wenner, Rush received a 2-minute standing ovation. As far as his politics, Peart has described himself as a "bleeding heart libertarian." His website includes a section on cooking called "Bubbas Bar 'n' Grill" and includes recipes, cooking techniques, and even a forum. During the Clockwork Angels tours, Peart fired t-shirts out of an air cannon at the beginning of the encore. In 2017, Peart and a three friends joined the elite "All Eight Club," a list of people who have spent time on all eight California Channel Islands. Neil Peart joins Rush 1st gig May 19, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment RUSH SHOW 32 The Starwood entrance in early 1979. Former names P.J.'s (1961-1973) Address 8151 Santa Monica Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90046 United States Coordinates 34.091028°N 118.366643°WCoordinates: 34.091028°N 118.366643°W Owner Eddie Nash Type Nightclub, music venue Genre(s) Entertainment Capacity 800 (500 seated) 400 standing at the Rock Room Opened 1973 Closed June 13, 1981 Years active 8 R U S H SHOW 2 May 18, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment JUN 11 1976 Rush Setlist at Massey Hall, Toronto, ON, Canada Tour: 2112 Tour statistics Add setlist Play Rush on Amazon Music Setlist SHARE SETLIST Bastille Day Play Video Anthem Play Video Lakeside Park Play Video 2112 Part I: Overture Play Video 2112 Part II: The Temples of Syrinx Play Video 2112 Part III: Discovery Play Video 2112 Part IV: Presentation Play Video 2112 Part VI: Soliloquy Play Video 2112 Part VII: Grand Finale Play Video Fly by Night Play Video In the Mood Play Video Something for Nothing Play Video By-Tor & The Snow Dog Play Video In the End Play Video Working Man Play Video Finding My Way Play Video Drum Solo Play Video What You're Doing R U S H SHOW 3 May 18, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment TOUR DATES DATE LOCATION VENUE FEBRUARY 9, 1976 HAMILTON, ONTARIO HAMILTON PLACE GREAT HALL FEBRUARY 21, 1976 BRANTFORD, ONTARIO BCI GYMNASEUM, BRANDFORD COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE MARCH 2, 1976 OTTAWA, ONTARIO OTTAWA CIVIC CENTRE MARCH 5, 1976 MT. PROSPECT, ILLINOIS RANDHURST MALL ICE ARENA MARCH 15, 1976 HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA STARWOOD MARCH 16, 1976 HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA STARWOOD MARCH 17, 1976 HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA STARWOOD MARCH 18, 1976 HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA STARWOOD MARCH 23, 1976 FRESNO, CALIFORNIA WARNORS THEATER MARCH 25, 1976 MEDFORD, OREGON ARMORY MARCH 26, 1976 YAKIMA, WASHINGTON CAPITOL THEATER MARCH 27, 1976 SPOKANE, WASHINGTON KENNEDY PAVILION, GONZAGA UNIVERSITY MARCH 28, 1976 PORTLAND, OREGON PARAMOUNT THEATER MARCH 29, 1976 TACOMA, WASHINGTON TACOMA NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY APRIL 7, 1976 PITTSBURGH PENNSYLVANIA CIVIC ARENA APRIL 9, 1976 INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA COLISEUM APRIL 10, 1976 SOUTH BEND, INDIANA MORRIS CIVIC CENTER APRIL 11, 1976 WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS ICE ARENA APRIL 15, 1976 ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI AMBASSADOR THEATER APRIL 17, 1976 PEKIN, ILLINOIS MEMORIAL ARENA APRIL 18, 1976 FLINT, MICHIGAN IMA SPORTS ARENA APRIL 26, 1976 AKRON, OHIO AKRON CIVIC THEATRE APRIL 27, 1976 CLEVELAND, OHIO ALLEN THEATRE APRIL 28, 1976 FLINT, MICHIGAN IMA AUDITORIUM APRIL 29, 1976 COLUMBUS OHIO VETERANS MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM APRIL 30, 1976 WATERLOO, IOWA MCELROY AUDITORIUM MAY 2, 1976 KANSAS CITY, KANSAS MEMORIAL HALL MAY 9, 1976 YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO TOMORROW CLUB MAY 11, 1976 DETROIT, MICHIGAN MASONIC AUDITORIUM MAY 13, 1976 BIG RAPIDS, MICHIGAN STARR AUDITORIM, FERRIS STATE COLLEGE MAY 22, 1976 DAVENPORT, IOWA RKO ORPHEUM THEATER MAY 23, 1976 DULUTH, MINNESOTA DULUTH ARENA MAY 24, 1976 LA CROSSE, WI MARY E. SAWYER AUDITORIUM MAY 25, 1976 FT. WAYNE, INDIANA MEMORIAL COLISEUM MAY 26, 1976 TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA HULMAN CIVIC UNIVERSITY CENTER MAY 27, 1976 GREEN BAY WISCONSIN BROWN COUNTY ARENA MAY 28, 1976 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS RIVIERA THEATER MAY 29, 1976 ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA ST. PAUL CIVIC CENTER ARENA MAY 30, 1976 SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS NELSON CENTER JUNE 4, 1976 AMARILLO, TEXAS CIVIC CENTER JUNE 5, 1976 EL PASO, TEXAS UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEMORIAL GYM JUNE 7, 1976 SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM JUNE 11, 1976 TORONTO, ONTARIO MASSEY HALL JUNE 12, 1976 TORONTO, ONTARIO MASSEY HALL JUNE 13, 1976 TORONTO, ONTARIO MASSEY HALL JUNE 15, 1976 CHATHAM, ONTARIO MEMORIAL ARENA JUNE 16, 1976 EVANSVILLE, INDIANA ROBERTS STADIUM JUNE 17, 1976 WELLAND, ONTARIO WELLAND ROSE FESTIVAL/WELLAND ARENA JUNE 18, 1976 OSHAWA, ONTARIO CIVIC AUDITORIUM JULY 8, 1976 SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA HIRSCH MEMORIAL COLISEUM JULY 10, 1976 DALLAS, TEXAS SMU MOODY COLISEUM JULY 11, 1976 HOUSTON, TEXAS SAM HOUSTON COLISEUM JULY 16, 1976 WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA WEST PALM BEACH AUDITORIUM JULY 18, 1976 DOTHAN, ALABAMA CIVIC CENTER JULY 20, 1976 CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS AUDITORIUM JULY 23, 1976 GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA TRIAD ARENA JULY 24, 1976 FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA CUMBERLAND COUNTY ARENA JULY 27, 1976 JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI UNIVERSITY HALL JULY 29, 1976 MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA GARRETT COLISEUM JULY 30, 1976 COLUMBUS, GEORGIA MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM AUGUST 1, 1976 HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA UNKNOWN VENUE SET LIST “Bastille Day” “Anthem” “Lakeside Park” “2112” (excludes “Oracle: The Dream”) “Fly By Night” “In The Mood” “Something For Nothing” “By-Tor and the Snow Dog” “In The End” “Working Man” “Finding My Way” Drum Solo ENCORE “What You’re Doing” R U S H May 18, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment June 11, 1976 Massey Hall -- Toronto, Ontario (Max Webster) [recorded for All The World's A Stage live album] - Click for Photos June 12, 1976 Massey Hall -- Toronto, Ontario (Max Webster) [recorded for All The World's A Stage live album] June 13, 1976 Massey Hall -- Toronto, Ontario (Max Webster) [recorded for All The World's A Stage live album] R U S H May 18, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment RUSH 1221 TOUR 1976-1977 June 11, 1976 Massey Hall -- Toronto, Ontario (Max Webster) [recorded for All The World's A Stage live album] - Click for Photos June 12, 1976 Massey Hall -- Toronto, Ontario (Max Webster) [recorded for All The World's A Stage live album] June 13, 1976 Massey Hall -- Toronto, Ontario (Max Webster) [recorded for All The World's A Stage live album] R U S H May 18, 2019
 Zimbelman2112 Entertainment Festival d'été de Québec 2013 Setlists JUL 4 2013 Date Thursday, July 4, 2013 - Sunday, July 14, 2013 Venues Impérial de Québec, Quebec City, QC, Canada Parc de la Francophonie, Quebec City, QC, Canada Place d'Youville, Quebec City, QC, Canada Plaines d'Abraham, Quebec City, QC, Canada So far there are setlists of 54 gigs. Thursday, July 4, 2013 Belle and Sebastian Madeleine Peyroux Add Setlist Friday, July 5, 2013 Alpha Blondy Bad Religion Classified David Marin Louis-Jean Cormier The Balconies The Hunters Wu‐Tang Clan Add Setlist Saturday, July 6, 2013 Eagles of Death Metal Father John Misty The Black Keys The Joy Formidable Add Setlist Sunday, July 7, 2013 -M- Avantasia Dr. John Les Trois Accords Voivod Xavier Caféïne Add Setlist Monday, July 8, 2013 Bernard Adamus Bruno Mars Ellie Goulding Keith Kouna Lisa LeBlanc Add Setlist Tuesday, July 9, 2013 Bears of Legend Emmylou Harris Justin Townes Earle Katerine MGMT Passion Pit Weezer Add Setlist Wednesday, July 10, 2013 Rush Add Setlist Thursday, July 11, 2013 Ingrid St‐Pierre Richard Desjardins Tiësto Add Setlist Friday, July 12, 2013 Guns N’ Roses Monster Truck Skillet Add Setlist Saturday, July 13, 2013 Danko Jones Daran Def Leppard Down With Webster Foreigner LP LeE HARVeY OsMOND Leif Vollebekk Marianas Trench Zaz Add Setlist Sunday, July 14, 2013 Raphael Saadiq Robert Charlebois Stevie Wonder The Sheepdogs Zaz R U S H May 18, 2019